The top 7 sci-fi dystopias of the future

The top 7 sci-fi dystopias of the future:Sci-fi dystopias are many, but the ones that stand out as truly distinctive or original are much less common.

In addition to commenting on the realities of our society, a great science fiction film also builds its own interpretation of reality.

In spite of how sad all the individuals in the movie may be, each of the films on this list has a meticulously created world that feels completely real to the viewer. These are well-designed universes, which only makes the one we really live in resonate with them more deeply.

7.Total Recall, 1990,

In 2084, when Mars has been colonised and people who resemble Arnold Schwarzenegger labour in construction, Total Recall is set, and it is full of the kind of vivid detail that only Paul Verhoeven could envision.

The plot of the film involves a sequence of possibly true occurrences, but what’s most striking about it is how it depicts the various technology that make up its dystopian future. Total Recall isn’t scared to take us to Mars, and it’s well worth the wait when we do.

6.The Hunger Games (2012),

The Hunger Games imagines a future in which 12 districts are ruled by a single Capitol that oppresses them in part by requiring some of their children to fight to the death. This future is set in a distant future in which the United States has been severely damaged by climate change and is now smaller and significantly less populous.

That premise, which has historical precedent, is compelling enough, but what gives this franchise’s dystopia a sense of verisimilitude is how those with privilege behave and dress in a way that is almost impeccably different from those in the districts who have nothing.

5.1999’s The Matrix

The Matrix was released at a time when the world was on the verge of something new. It is set in a future where humans exist solely to provide energy for machines and only exist in a simulation of reality. The way the movie contrasted the immaculate, artificial environment of the Matrix with the terrible dystopia of the real world, however, is what made it such a huge hit.The film Wall-E tells the tale of a trash collector robot that unintentionally learns that Earth can be rescued. The plot is set on a version of Earth that is littered with waste and has long since been abandoned by humanity. The journey he takes, which eventually develops into a love story, is lovely in and of itself, but Wall-E also envisions a future in which humanity is still there despite having been almost paralysed.

Even more striking is its vision of Earth, where the entire world has turned into a desert. Wall-E is still one of Pixar’s best films and one of its most overtly political ones.

The Matrix made the case that the actual world was still worth keeping even though it was fundamentally flawed, and even though some people disliked the sequels, they further developed this argument.

4.1968’s Planet of the Apes

One of the things that made Planet of the Apes so renowned was the big surprise at the conclusion, but even before we get to that, the film introduces us to an ape-run society with its own set of laws and social hierarchies.

The most startling aspect of the film is how much of it unfolds like a courtroom drama as a human tries to justify why he can communicate on a world where other humans cannot. The portrayal of the film’s namesake planet is intriguing long before the film’s climactic events, which convert Planet of the Apes into a warning about the atomic era.

3. Akira (1988)

1988’s Akira Trailer
There have been several excellent films portraying the effects of dropping the atomic bomb on Japan, but none more terrifyingly portrays the future than Akira.

The story follows a young boy who is striving to protect his companion from a government experiment in a world where Tokyo was hit by an atomic bomb 30 years before. But as his friend’s skills start to show, we learn the full extent of the Japanese government’s secrets and witness a horrible allegory for the agony of witnessing the atomic bomb.

2.Wall-E (2008)

The film Wall-E tells the tale of a trash collector robot that unintentionally learns that Earth can be rescued. The plot is set on a version of Earth that is littered with waste and has long since been abandoned by humanity. The journey he takes, which eventually develops into a love story, is lovely in and of itself, but Wall-E also envisions a future in which humanity is still there despite having been almost paralysed.

Even more striking is its vision of Earth, where the entire world has turned into a desert. Wall-E is still one of Pixar’s best films and one of its most overtly political ones.

The 1982 film Blade Runner and the 2017 film Blade Runner 2049

From its future, pyramid-like building to its hologram technologies, the world of Blade Runner and its sequel feels so vividly realised that it nearly wins this competition. Both of these films feature famous production designs, as well as the concept of replicants that are essentially indistinguishable from humans.

These two films together depict a world that is completely foreign to our own while also feeling vaguely familiar, and it is this combination that gives both films their allure.

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